Manuscripts accepted for Calls for Papers will be included in one of our Collections.


 

 

Calls Closing in July 2017

  • Central Pattern Generators
  • Closes July 1, 2017

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neural networks that produce rhythmic patterned outputs. CPGs can function without sensory feedback, although feedback signals often alter the activity of these networks. CPGs control a number of motor functions in invertebrates, as well as specialized functions in vertebrates including locomotion, swallowing, and respiration. This Call is for papers that describe the composition, modulation, and function of CPGs in both invertebrates and vertebrates.

    Submit your manuscript.


  • The Mouse Visual System
  • Closes July 1, 2017

    Studies during the last decade have shown that mice are an important model in vision research. Aided by modern neuroscience techniques, many research labs are investigating the mouse visual system, spanning from studies of the retina and subcortical structures to visual cortex and visually guided behaviors. This Call is for papers that use the mouse model to study the organization, function, and development of the visual system.

    Submit your manuscript.


  • Where Are You Going? The Neurobiology of Navigation
  • Closes July 1, 2017

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser, and Edvard I. Moser “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain.” Over the past two decades, considerable information has been gained about the neural systems that determine place location, map the environment, and allow animals and humans to navigate through space. This Call is for papers that provide insights into these neural systems in animal models (both vertebrates and invertebrates) and humans.

    Submit your manuscript.

     

     

     

    Calls Closing in January 2018

  • Working Memory: Neural Mechanisms
  • Closes January 1, 2018

    Working memory, a core executive function, is a cognitive system that is responsible for the transient holding, processing, and manipulation of information. Working memory is an important process for reasoning and the guidance of decision making and behavior. Although the neural mechanisms of working memory have been explored for decades, the field is now in flux as a result of recent innovative experiments using a variety of techniques, including human fMRI, primate neurophysiology, and optogenetics in rodents. This Call is focused on the neural mechanisms of working memory.

    Submit your manuscript.


  • 50 Years of Microneurography: Insights into Neural Mechanisms in Humans
  • Closes January 1, 2018

    Microneurography is a neurophysiological method to record nerve impulses in peripheral nerves of waking human subjects. The method has been successfully employed to reveal functional properties of sensory systems related to touch, pain, and proprioception, as well as to decipher the control of movement and sympathetic nervous system activity. This Call is focused on studies that utilize microneurography to probe neural mechanisms in human subjects.

    Submit your manuscript.


  • Control of Coordinated Movements
  • Closes January 1, 2018

    Orienting actions to interact with our environment generally employ complex coordination across multiple effectors. For example, changes in our line of sight need not be limited to the oculomotor system alone but instead are produced by a coordinated movement of the eyes, head, torso, legs, and even eyelids. Reaching movements generally also integrate eye and head movements along with changes in posture, while grasp involves coordination across various muscles and joints of the hand. In contrast to the complexity observed in natural behavior, motor control studies typically consider effectors in isolation, effectively limiting our ability to understand the neural control of complex actions. This Call is therefore focused on studies that consider integration of movements across multiple effectors.

    Submit your manuscript.